The Trail Map We’ve All Been Waiting For

A new online inventory maps West Virginia's trails.


Published:

Image Source: mapwv.gov/trails

We’ve challenged you to a summer of outdoor adventure. The National Wildlife Federation has proposed a movement to get 10 million kids outside running, playing, swimming, and generally having fun, and in West Virginia we know there’s no limit to the opportunities to get a kid’s heart racing, young or old.

We also know it can be difficult to tear yourself away from a computer screen long enough to enjoy what’s just outside in your backyard—and today you don’t have to. In fact, we suggest staying online long enough to check out West Virginia’s new outdoor trail inventory map. Trust us—this thing is awesome. A project two years in the making, according to a Charleston Daily Mail report, the West Virginia Trail Inventory provides an overview of public trails, their start and end points, approved uses, elevations, and managing agencies. Just click on a trail of interest and all of the information pops up.

Zoom in on the map to get more detailed information by county. Click on the West Fork Rail-Trail running through Pocahontas and Randolph counties and you’ll find that it’s 25.3 miles long and open for hiking, horseback riding, and biking. The Monongahela National Forest Greenbrier Ranger Station has more information about the trail, and the map provides links to appropriate organization websites. You can even get exact coordinates for trail areas, which might be especially helpful for all you geocachers out there. Or just those of us with a tendency to get lost. 

The project is about 90 percent complete, according to the Daily Mail. Trails in southern counties will be included as mapping progresses.

So get out there and take a hike—and this time, take your smartphone with you.

Each Wednesday on wvliving.com, we will feature one outdoor recreation area along with some fun suggestions to get your kids outdoors. And we want you to share your photos and stories with us—they may appear online or in a future issue of the magazine. Join us by committing to taking our children to our state parks, hiking in the wilderness, camping, fishing, and growing gardens.

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